THE MINIMUM WAGE (FOR UNDER AGE 25) £6.95 per hour is the current minimum wage for workers aged 21 - 25. For 18 -21s, the rate is £5.55 per hour, while minors can expect to earn £4.00 for each hour worked. Wages for all workers are set to increase for all age groups in April 2017, according to the gov.uk website. Here you can check if your employer is paying you what you are entitled too. However, the national minimum wage is no sure thing for many, with the self-employed, interns and under 16s among those facing the most uncertainty.

THE MINIMUM WAGE (FOR UNDER AGE 25)

£6.95 per hour is the current minimum wage for workers aged 21 - 25. For 18 -21s, the rate is £5.55 per hour, while minors can expect to earn £4.00 for each hour worked. Wages for all workers are set to increase for all age groups in April 2017, according to the gov.uk website. Here you can check if your employer is paying you what you are entitled too. However, the national minimum wage is no sure thing for many, with the self-employed, interns and under 16s among those facing the most uncertainty.

CAFFEINE 165 million cups of tea daily, as well a 70 million cups of coffee. Safe to say Britain is a caffeinated nation. Agreed to be a natural stimulant, opinions vary on this 'socially acceptable psychoactive drug', given that its heralded health benefits are accompanied by increased risks of insomnia, tremors and feelings of addiction. 

CAFFEINE

165 million cups of tea daily, as well a 70 million cups of coffee. Safe to say Britain is a caffeinated nation. Agreed to be a natural stimulant, opinions vary on this 'socially acceptable psychoactive drug', given that its heralded health benefits are accompanied by increased risks of insomnia, tremors and feelings of addiction. 

DIAZEPAM Used to treat anxiety disorders as well as insomnia and seizures, Diazepam is a prescribed medication. It belongs to a family of drugs called benzodiazepines and was originally called Valium. Short-term use of Diazepam can help people struggling with their mental health. Improper or excessive use of Diazepam can lead to dependence and dangerous side effects. It is estimated that around nine million benzodiazepines are prescribed annually in the UK. Charities such as Mind can offer impartial advice on many aspects of mental health.

DIAZEPAM

Used to treat anxiety disorders as well as insomnia and seizures, Diazepam is a prescribed medication. It belongs to a family of drugs called benzodiazepines and was originally called Valium. Short-term use of Diazepam can help people struggling with their mental health. Improper or excessive use of Diazepam can lead to dependence and dangerous side effects. It is estimated that around nine million benzodiazepines are prescribed annually in the UK. Charities such as Mind can offer impartial advice on many aspects of mental health.

 
ALCHOHOL Whether in the form of larger, wine, spirits or other favourites, alcohol is acknowledged by many to be a cultural norm. A natural depressant, alcohol is nonetheless credited as a party-starter and a dispeller of inhibitions.  The effects of alcohol on the body are complex, both short and long term. Short term risks include increased aggression and/or depression, vomiting and blood poisoning, Long term excessive consumption of alcohol increases the risk of several diseases including cancer, heart disease and pancreatitis. For more information, visit www.drinkaware.co.uk.      

ALCHOHOL

Whether in the form of larger, wine, spirits or other favourites, alcohol is acknowledged by many to be a cultural norm. A natural depressant, alcohol is nonetheless credited as a party-starter and a dispeller of inhibitions.  The effects of alcohol on the body are complex, both short and long term. Short term risks include increased aggression and/or depression, vomiting and blood poisoning, Long term excessive consumption of alcohol increases the risk of several diseases including cancer, heart disease and pancreatitis. For more information, visit www.drinkaware.co.uk.      

THE CONTRACEPTIVE PILL Contraceptive pills contain artificial versions of either one or a combination of the female hormones oestrogen and progesterone. The pill prevents a woman's ovaries from releasing an egg, and therefore is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. The pill does not protect against STIs. One third of British women aged 16–49 currently take a contraceptive pill. Benefits of the pill besides birth control include its discreetness and its reduction in the frequency or intensity of periods. Side effects include headaches, nausea, breast tenderness and mood swings, while research continues into the link between the contraceptive pill and cancer. Clinical trials of a 'male pill' are ongoing. Advice about all contraceptives can be found at NHS Choices.

THE CONTRACEPTIVE PILL

Contraceptive pills contain artificial versions of either one or a combination of the female hormones oestrogen and progesterone. The pill prevents a woman's ovaries from releasing an egg, and therefore is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. The pill does not protect against STIs. One third of British women aged 16–49 currently take a contraceptive pill. Benefits of the pill besides birth control include its discreetness and its reduction in the frequency or intensity of periods. Side effects include headaches, nausea, breast tenderness and mood swings, while research continues into the link between the contraceptive pill and cancer. Clinical trials of a 'male pill' are ongoing. Advice about all contraceptives can be found at NHS Choices.

CO-CODAMOL Co-codamol is a pain killer containing codeine and paracetamol. Unlike paracetamol, ibuprofen or aspirin, co-codamol is rarely accessed 'over-the-counter';  it is prescribed when the relief provided by these household pain killers is not sufficient. Backache, sciatica, toothache, headaches and period pains are among the forms of acute pain which co-codamol can be used to treat. Side effects should be guarded against with caution. These include dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, constipation, nausea and vomiting. A safe dosage of co-codamol for one person could be dangerous for another. 

CO-CODAMOL

Co-codamol is a pain killer containing codeine and paracetamol. Unlike paracetamol, ibuprofen or aspirin, co-codamol is rarely accessed 'over-the-counter';  it is prescribed when the relief provided by these household pain killers is not sufficient. Backache, sciatica, toothache, headaches and period pains are among the forms of acute pain which co-codamol can be used to treat. Side effects should be guarded against with caution. These include dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, constipation, nausea and vomiting. A safe dosage of co-codamol for one person could be dangerous for another.